The Student News Site of West Brunswick High School

The West Wind

The Student News Site of West Brunswick High School

The West Wind

The Student News Site of West Brunswick High School

The West Wind

Polls

Which is better?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

A Peek In Twin Minds

Pictures+of+the+Sauls+twins+and+McCoy+twins+then+and+now.
Pictures of the Sauls twins and McCoy twins then and now.

Do you ever feel like you’re seeing double? Twins have that effect on us, but not all twins look just alike; West has a plethora of twins, but while fraternal twins Kyle and Caleb McCoy and Sloane and Sydney Sauls look similar, they are their own people outside of being twins. 

”It’s like having built-in best friends, but they have their differences,” said Sloane. “Being a twin is kinda cool. We like being twins because it’s different and separates us, making us different from others.”

Are twins siblings? Yes, but their relationships are often very different from your average sets of siblings. Multiples grew up together from day one, literally–they are often closer and have a special bond.

“I think our relationship is stronger as twins rather than not being a twin,” said Caleb. “When we were younger, I couldn’t speak well, but Kyle always knew what I was saying and helped others understand me.”

 

Both Sauls and Mccoy state that their relationships are stronger because they are twins. We see twins in the media often, and we hear jokes about “twin telepathy” and being more in-tune with each other.

“It’s like you always have a friend along with you, but sometimes I don’t like having a twin,” said Sloane. “Because we have the same friends and activities, it’s like we are stuck together.”

The idea of being “stuck together” seems to be a common one with twins. Whether it’s due to genetics or environment, twins often end up with a partner in all of their activities and milestones, sometimes making it hard to feel special.

“It was kinda annoying having a twin when we were younger,” said Kyle. “We did everything together, our license, birthdays. As of right now, it’s not as annoying because we look less alike and have different friend groups.”

It is important to remember being a twin doesn’t mean losing your individuality. You always have your own personality, interests, and strengths. 

 “One of us is stronger in academics and one is stronger in sports/athletics,” said Caleb.

Naturally, twins have a lot in common, both Mccoy and Sauls stated that they have similar styles with their twin and also both have that mystified “twin telepathy” when getting ready in the morning, causing arguments on who will change and who won’t. 

“Sometimes we will come out of our rooms with the same clothes on and we fight about who’s gonna change: same shirt, different color but it’s still the same clothes,” said Sydney.

While every twin has thought about not having a twin and being more individual, twins often feel they are lucky to have a built-in best friend to share their memories with, as well as someone to grow with in life. 

“Sometimes we don’t like being twins, and sometimes we do–it depends on the day, but if we weren’t twins we think we would still be friends,” said Sydney and Sloane. “Having a fraternal twin is cool because most people don’t see us as twins but sisters when they don’t know us, and they are shocked when you tell them.”

Donate to The West Wind
$100
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of West Brunswick High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
About the Contributor
Aniston Mclamb, Staff writer
Aniston McLamb is a 16-year-old sophomore. She was born in Loris, SC but grew up in Supply. Just recently, she moved to Ash where she lives with her parents and little sister. Mclamb is now going on her 11th year of dancing for “Simply Dance” in Whiteville. Her parents put her in dance at the age of five, and her love grew quickly. Her favorite style of dance is hip-hop because it is up-beat and allows her to let loose.  “Dance is my escape,” said McLamb. “Whenever I am dancing I feel like all my problems go away–the studio is my happy place.”  This is McLamb’s first semester in journalism. She wanted to join the class because she was in search of something new. She wanted to take a class that is interactive with the school and a class that keeps her busy.  “I joined journalism because I was interested in the social media aspect of the class,” said McLamb. “I have seen Tiktoks on my ‘for you’ page of the class and it seemed like something I wanted to get involved with.”  Outside of the West Brunswick walls, McLamb found an interest in attending and competing in pageants. She has been doing pageants avidly since she was two years old thanks to the support from her mom and the rest of her family. “I recently won the Fair Bluff Watermelon Festival Teen Miss,” said McLamb. “Pageants are going to stay consistent in my life, and I don’t think I’ll be stopping soon.” McLamb plans on going to UNC Chapel Hill. She hopes to pursue a career as a General OB/GYN. She has been thinking about going into this field since middle school.  “I have wanted to go to UNC Chapel Hill since forever,” said Mclamb. “Going there has always been a dream of mine. If Chapel Hill doesn’t work out, my goal is to go to another college with a good medical program.”  
Donate to The West Wind
$100
$500
Contributed
Our Goal