The Student News Site of West Brunswick High School

The West Wind

The Student News Site of West Brunswick High School

The West Wind

The Student News Site of West Brunswick High School

The West Wind

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How to: act like you care…When You Don’t

Two+people+conversing
Two people conversing

You have probably been in a situation in which someone tried to talk to you and you really didn’t feel up to it. Often, you feel the need to act like you’re interested so you don’t jeopardize an important relationship. In most cases, you simply need to look like you are listening. If that is the case, use these tips to help you get through those dreadful conversations.

 

Use non-verbal Communication You can use nonverbal communication to show you are listening by maintaining eye contact. Eye contact is a key part of showing someone you are paying attention and listening. Studies have shown that eye contact is one of the most important things you can do to show acuteness (Studies here).

You can also express nonverbal communication by nodding your head and showing a relaxed posture to show you are comfortable and concentrated.

 

Encouraging words to show understanding (even if you don’t understand). When speaking to someone, try to cut some time in when the speaker is taking a breath by stating words such as:

  • “Really?!”
  • “Whoa…”
  • “NO.”  

Remember, tone is very important to show that you are being attentive, not negligent and rude. When saying even the most simple words such as “yes,” you should have an open attitude to show acknowledgment and understanding.

 

Repeat or paraphrase This shows you are actually listening even if it is a very dull discussion. When you repeat something or put in your own input, it could possibly make the other converser feel respected.

 

Body Language Is the most important step to show you care. For example, when you have your arms crossed and your body facing the opposite direction as someone, it makes it look like you are angry or unmindful. Whereas standing or sitting up straight and facing your body towards them shows attentiveness. Now, if you don’t care about being unmindful and will do anything to get out of the situation, then feel free to make your body language as closed-off as possible.

Time to end Opportunities may present themselves to finally end the conversation. So take them, whether it’s a lame excuse about your father’s college roommate’s lizard, it doesn’t matter. End your suffering. If you want to take a more polite excuse, you could say something similar to, “Well, it’s been great talking to you. I should probably go.” Then finally you are free to go about your life until the next horrific conversation.

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About the Contributor
Avery Babson, Staff Writer
Avery Babson is a 15-year-old sophomore from Shallotte, North Carolina. This is her first year of West Wind Newspaper and she is most looking forward to doing interviews and further learning photojournalism. Babson’s goal for the school year is to get more involved in school clubs and events.   “I hope to learn how to get better at talking to people,” said Babson. “Learn more social skills and be more active in school. Last year I did nothing other than book club.”   Babson’s favorite subject in school is English, in her free time, you can find her reading a book or playing with her dog, Cooper. Although Babson doesn't know what she wants to do in the future, she has her goals set for an Ivy League college.    “I’d like to go to an Ivy League college because I have confidence in my GPA and club experience,” said Babson. “ I want to push myself to be the greatest I can be."
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